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- eu court adviser backs data retention with strict rules 2016 7 - One of the West’s biggest cybersecurity vulnerabilities is our idiotic habit of sending servers full of sensitive information to foreign countries –

Credits: businessinsider

Western companies routinely abandon confidential, sensitive, and personally identifying to private companies in when they upgrade their , workstations, and networking gear for new hardware, a source tells Business Insider.

The unprotected data is a goldmine for .

The source, based in Romania, approached us after reading our December 22 article on whether hackers had the ability to take entire countries offline. The source runs an IT hardware refurbishment company that buys up old equipment from countries such as Spain, the Benelux area, and the UK, and sells it to customers who don’t need top-spec equipment. Typically he is buying truckloads of old servers, “stuff that is past its prime or out of warranty, but it is still perfectly usable. The procedure is simple: hardware comes in, gets evaluated, fixed, wiped, sold,” the source says.

The problem, our source says, is that even when the incoming hardware has been marked as being already wiped clean it often is not.

A “mostly complete” directory of “passwords for a major European aerospace manufacturer”

“Over the last 3 years I have found a lot of crazy things,” the source says, including:

  • A mostly complete database of the Dutch public health insurance system, with social security data, billing, addresses, medical histories. “Imagine the social engineering scams you could do with this data,” the source says.
  • Codes, software and procedures for the traffic lights and railway signalling “for a few major Spanish cities.” “Imagine the potentially deadly effects of this getting where it shouldn’t,” he adds.
  • Customer credit card data including addresses and shopping habits for a major UK supermarket chain.
  • And, alarmingly, “a mostly complete (and as far as I could tell, still up to date and functional) employee directory with access codes / badges / smartcards / passwords for a major European aerospace manufacturer.”

Our source asked for anonymity because his company and its clients would be angered if their identities appeared in an article about lax security.

But two independent sources with industrial cybersecurity expertise – Nir Giller, the CTO of CyberX and Darktrace Director of Technology Andrew Tonschev – both confirmed to Business Insider that the Romanian source’s scenario was both common and plausible.

“Right now, I’m looking at the sensor listing, their IP’s and access data”

“Even now, I am processing the remains of a server farm that until a month or so ago, was part of a power company in France,” our source says. The buyer noted the ability of hackers to burn down factories simply by accessing unprotected systems which control things like temperature sensors that prevent equipment from burning out. “Guess what, data [from the French company] is still there,” the source claims. “Right now, I’m looking at the sensor listing, their IP’s and access data. Obviously, I’m sanitizing everything before passing it on, but it never should have gotten into my hands in the first place.”

The source says that sometimes the data he finds is so critical that he contacts the originating company to alert them to that they have a problem with security. “In most cases the reaction was one of disbelief, ‘no, it cannot happen to us, we’re well protected!’”

As more companies lease server space, fewer of them know what happens when those leases end

The problem exists because of the way server space is discarded by large corporations. Few companies want the bother of maintaining their own server farms. So they lease space from specialists. At the end of a lease, companies can walk away from their contracts – leaving the servers with the vendor, which is supposed to carefully destroy the data. Alternatively, when older servers reach the end of their warranty they are replaced in “forklift” upgrades, en masse. In both cases, the disused servers are supposed to be wiped by certified experts using special software and approved processes. In reality, it’s quicker to skip steps, or not do it properly, or let mistakes go. The result is that the original data is often accessible even when an old server has been certified clean.

“The West is failing at an institutional level to keep their critical data safe,” the source says “No need for CSI-worthy hacking stories, just a credit card to buy up your used hardware – odds are the data will be still there, even if someone marked them as already wiped.”

- logo16 - One of the West’s biggest cybersecurity vulnerabilities is our idiotic habit of sending servers full of sensitive information to foreign countries –

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Sadik Shaikh | Cyber Suraksha Abhiyan, Ethical Hacking Training Institute, CEHv10,CHFI,ECSAv10,CAST,ENSA, CCNA, CCNA SECURITY,MCITP,RHCE,CHECKPOINT, ASA FIREWALL,VMWARE,CLOUD,ANDROID,IPHONE,NETWORKING HARDWARE,TRAINING INSTITUTE IN PUNE, Certified Ethical Hacking,Center For Advanced Security Training in India, ceh v10 course in Pune-India, ceh certification in pune-India, ceh v10 training in Pune-India, Ethical Hacking Course in Pune-India



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